Home » Get Ready for taxes: What’s new and what to consider when filing in 2023
January 2, 2023
tjohnson

Get Ready for taxes: What’s new and what to consider when filing in 2023

Some tax credits return to 2019 levels. This means that affected taxpayers will likely receive a significantly smaller refund compared with the previous tax year. Changes include amounts for the Child Tax Credit (CTC), Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Child and Dependent Care Credit.

  • Those who got $3,600 per dependent in 2021 for the CTC will, if eligible, get $2,000 for the 2022 tax year.
  • For the EITC, eligible taxpayers with no children who received roughly $1,500 in 2021 will now get $500 in 2022.
  • The Child and Dependent Care Credit returns to a maximum of $2,100 in 2022 instead of $8,000 in 2021.

2021 and 2022 PTC Eligibility. For tax years 2021 and 2022, the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (ARPA) temporarily expanded eligibility for the premium tax credit by eliminating the rule that a taxpayer with household income above 400% of the federal poverty line cannot qualify for a premium tax credit.

No above-the-line charitable deductions. During COVID, taxpayers could take up to a $600 charitable donation tax deduction on their tax returns. However, in 2022, those who take a standard deduction may not take an above-the-line deduction for charitable donations.

Avoid refund delays and understand refund timing

Many different factors can affect the timing of a refund after the IRS receives a return. Although the IRS issues most refunds in less than 21 days, the IRS cautions taxpayers not to rely on receiving a 2022 federal tax refund by a certain date, especially when making major purchases or paying bills. Some returns may require additional review and may take longer to process if IRS systems detect a possible error, the return is missing information or there is suspected identity theft or fraud.

Also, the IRS cannot issue refunds for people claiming the EITC or Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC) before mid-February. The law requires the IRS to hold the entire refund – not just the portion associated with EITC or ACTC.

Categories: Blog

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

©2023. All rights reserved. | Powered by Zywave Websites

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.